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This beer packaging is edible and helps save marine wildlife

A small craft beer company came up with a brilliant idea and started producing 100% biodegradable and edible six-pack rings. To protect marine animals.

US-based craft beer company Saltwater Brewery, in collaboration with advertising agency We Believers, has launched a beer packaging that is 100 per cent edible.

The problem of ocean plastic

The idea stems from the need to protect oceans and marine wildlife from the huge amount of plastic humans dump on the world’s beaches and seas every year. Plastic represents a real threat to animals that mistake it for food. “Up to 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals and sea turtles become trapped in plastic or digest it and die,” according to marine biologist Mark Tukulka.

 

Innovative, biodegradable six-pack rings

The innovative packaging has been created thanks to the use of by-products obtained from the brewing process, such as barley and wheat. Being 100 per cent biodegradable and edible, this product becomes a safe “snack” for animals and, if it isn’t ingested, it decomposes quickly.

 

The first batch of edible six-pack rings was produced and tested in April. “This innovative technology is resistant and efficient as the plastic six-pack rings,” tells the company in its promotional video.

 

Given their newness, edible six-pack rings are more expensive to produce. “If most craft breweries and big beer companies would implement this technology, the manufacturing cost would drop and be very competitive,” according to Saltwater Brewery. “We want to influence the big guys and inspire them to get on board,” adds Chris Gove, the company’s president.

 

 

By doing so, the impact of this product could contribute to saving hundreds of thousands of marine animals. However, note that this kind of waste represents just a small percentage of what ends up in the oceans. We should reconsider our habits in order to avoid threatening the life of other species populating the Earth.

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