Store
Climate Change Conference

All you need to know about the Islamic Declaration on Global Climate Change

Drawn up by the representatives of the Islamic world, the Declaration invites people to protect “the earth’s fine equilibrium”.

Over 60 representatives of the Islamic world, coming from 20 countries, took part to the symposium hold on 17 and 19 August in Istanbul. The meeting ended with the drafting of the Islamic Declaration on Global Climate Change. An important stance of the Islamic world that urges 1.6 million Muslims to protect the earth’s fine equilibrium (mīzān), and political leaders to reach new binding deal during the next climate change conference to be held in Paris, since: “Human activity is putting such a strain on the natural functions of the earth that the ability of the planet’s ecosystems to sustain future generations can no longer be taken for granted.”

 

Unicef four_Indonesia_1500px

 

Here are some of the key points:

  • Ecosystems and human cultures are already at risk from climate change;
  • Risks resulting from climate change caused by extreme events such as heat waves, extreme precipitation and coastal flooding are on the rise;
  • These risks are unevenly distributed, and are generally greater for the poor and disadvantaged communities of every country, at all levels of development;
  • Foreseeable impacts will affect adversely Earth’s biodiversity, the goods and services provided by our ecosystems, and our overall global economy;
  • The Earth’s core physical systems themselves are at risk of abrupt and irreversible changes.

 

The declaration affirms that:

  • God created the Earth in perfect equilibrium (mīzān);
  • By His immense mercy we have been given fertile land, fresh air, clean water and all the good things on Earth that makes our lives here viable and delightful;
  • The Earth functions in natural seasonal rhythms and cycles: a climate in which living beings – including humans – thrive;
  • The present climate change catastrophe is a result of the human disruption of this balance.

 

Therefore, the Declaration calls to:

  • Stabilize greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate systems;
  • Lead the way in phasing out their greenhouse gas emissions as early as possible and no later than the middle of the century;
  • Recognize the moral obligation to reduce consumption so that the poor may benefit from what is left of the earth’s non-renewable resources;
  • Stay within the ‘2 degree’ limit, or, preferably, within the ‘1.5 degree’ limit, bearing in mind that two-thirds of the earth’s proven fossil fuel reserves remain in the ground;
  • Commit to 100 % renewable energy and/or a zero emissions strategy as early as possible.

 

Here’s the integral version of the Declaration.

 

Cover photo ©Daniele Lembo/Flickr

Translated by

Related articles