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Circus Zambia, giving street children the chance to blossom through performance art

Circus Zambia uses performance art to improve the lives of vulnerable children, empowering them with circus and life skills.

Circus Zambia was founded by a group of four young acrobats in 2014, all born and raised in Chibolya, a poor compound that houses over 20,000 people in less than five square kilometres in the Zambian capital, Lusaka. With a rich experience gained from tours, performances, training and workshops around the world, the artists are specialised in juggling, aerial acrobatics, acrobatic dance, hand balancing, fire breathing, banquine and cyr wheel.

Circus Zambia
Circus Zambia performing © Circus Zambia

Helping disadvantaged children

“Most children we work with have been exposed to drugs and all sorts of injustices,” explains Performance Manager Amos Malokwa. “We feel it is our responsibility to empower them with art in order for them to reach their full potential and especially provide an enabling environment for these disadvantaged kids to blossom”.

Circus Zambia OYDC
Circus Zambia performs at the OYDC in Lusaka © Mike Mwenda

On the streets of Lusaka hundreds of children are vulnerable to a wide range of threats and pitfalls: gang violence, bullying, rape and child trafficking, the lure of a booming marijuana trade, as well that of other substances has been left uncheck. All the more reason why Circus Zambia tries to combat these issues by giving children what they need to get off the streets and stay off them.

Inspiring young people

“We strongly believe that the children we work with still have dreams, ambitions and visions about becoming future leaders of our country one day and also whose lives need to be protected and respected,” according to Finance Manager, Benard Kaumba.

Circus Zambia Arts Festival
Circus Zambia during the African Circus Arts Festival 2015 © Adriano Marzi

Furthermore, Circus Zambia aspires to establish a Circus School in Chibolya, a creative hub where children can develop their skills and can be linked to other organizations. “We want to give them an opportunity where they can run, jump, fly and land safely,” says Kaumba.

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