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World Press Photo 2018, the winning image shows how the crisis is burning Venezuela

The winners of the world’s most prestigious photojournalism contest have been announced. From the Venezuela crisis to a new category dedicated to the environment, here are all the images from the World Press Photos 2018.

The winning images of the World Press Photo 2018, the world’s most important photojournalism contest, have been announced on 12 April by the World Press Photo Foundation in Amsterdam, Netherlands. With the aim of honouring the photo that with visual creativity and technique represents and depicts an event or an issue of great journalistic importance occured over the past year, the picture titled Venezuela crisis by photographer Ronaldo Schemidt has been named World Press Photo of the Year.

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The Venezuela crisis is the World Press Photo of the Year 2018

In the winning image, taken on 3 May 2017, 28-year-old José Víctor Salazar Balza runs while catching fire amid clashes with police during a protest against President Nicolás Maduro, in Caracas. Mass protests across the country were called by opposition leaders after Venezuelan president took some measures to consolidate his legislation powers, and peaked on that day with protesters (mostly hooded and masked) starting lighting fires and throwing rocks. Schemidt’s photo, commissioned by Agence France Presse, has also won the first prize in the Spot News category, single images. “It’s quite symbolic, actually. The man, he has a mask on his face. He’s come to sort of represent not just himself and himself on fire, but sort of this idea of Venezuela burning,” said jury member Whitney C. Johnson, deputy director of photography National Geographic.

The winning images of the World Press Photo 2018 

At its 61st edition, this year’s World Press Photo contest received more than 73,000 photos by over 4,500 photographers from 125 countries. Of them, 42 photographers have been awarded for eight categories – Contemporary issues, Environment, General news, Long-term projects, Nature, People, Sports and Spot news. Among the issues depicted in the winning photos are the Rohingya crisis in Patrick Brown’s powerful shot, the war in Iraq with the battle for Mosul by Ivor Prickett, the attack in Las Vegas by David Becker, the girls of Boko Haram by Adam Ferguson and the safeguard of elephants in the stories of Ami Vitale.

A new category dedicated to the environment

A new category dedicated to the environment has been added to the contest this year, for documenting the impact humanity has on it in terms of overpopulation, pollution, and the extinction of the species. From rhinos being relocated from country to country in order to flee poachhers’ attacks for their horns (which are worth up to 50,000 euros per kilo on the black market), to the deforestation of the Amazon, our Planet’s green lung.

Primo premio Ambiente, foto singole. Waiting for freedom, Neil Aldridg.  Un cucciolo di rinoceronte bianco st aper essere rilasciato a Okavango Delta, in Botswana, dopo essere stato spostato dal Sudafrica per essere protetto dai bracconieri © Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo 2018
Environment, 1st prize, single images. Waiting for freedom, Neil Aldridg © Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo 2018

The varied photographic and journalistic contents of this prestigious prize help give an insight about our world, including the issues that are too often overlooked or forgotten quickly. Among them, the effects people have on others and on what surrounds them, which ultimately means on themselves.

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