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Pearl Jam donate 54,000 dollars to protect forests in Latin America

Pearl Jam decided to offset CO2 emissions generated during their tours by funding a project aimed to protect forests in Latin America.

On 28 November, Pearl Jam closed their Latin American tour of nine dates started on 4 November 2015, where they also played cover songs of popular bands including Comfortably numb by Pink FloydImagine by John Lennon and a U2’s songs cover.

 

pearl jam concert brazil
Pearl Jam in a concert in Brazil © Flickr_Caliel Costa

 

But the Seattle band leaves its mark in Latin America for another reason: Pearl Jam decided to offset carbon emissions generated during their tours by supporting projects aimed at mitigating emissions into the atmosphere. The band will invest in projects for the compensation of greenhouse gas emissions that fit with the plan developed and formulated by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

 

The donation of as much as 54,000 dollars will support two preservation and protection projects of natural sites and habitats: the former is a project of the American NGO Carbon Fund, that operates in Brazil to protect the Amazon rainforest; the latter is the Alto Mayo Project, launched by the non-profit organisation Conservation International, whose goal is to preserve forests in the Peruvian area of Alto Mayo.

 

Stone Gossard, guitarist of the band, said:

I think it’s good to acknowledge the negative impacts our business has on the planet, right alongside the positive ones. We tour. Our tours emit carbon dioxide. We are constantly looking at ways to reduce and mitigate that. Our strategy has been to essentially ‘tax’ ourselves for our CO2-equivalent emissions, and invest that money into carbon mitigation projects. Hopefully this will serve as inspiration for other businesses and governments exploring ways to offset their carbon footprints.

 

Actually, this is not the first time that Pearl Jam commit themselves to protect the environment: the band has been keeping track of the greenhouse gas emissions generated during their concerts since 2003 and up to now, they have invested more than 500,000 dollars in carbon offsetting projects.

 

In their Brazilian tour, Pearl Jam played live in Belo Horizonte, where they commemorated the victims of the recent mining disaster, where a river of toxic mud flooded the village of Bento Rodrigues in Mariana, a town in  the area of Minas Gerais, and polluted thousands of square kilometres of land, reaching the Atlantic Ocean.

Translated by

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