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M.I.A. releases a new video for the World Recycle Week

In order to raise awareness on recycling old clothes, M.I.A. joins H&M’s campaign World Recycle Week with her new song and video ‘Rewear It’.

Raising public awareness on recycling and a more sustainable lifestyle. This is the goal of the environmentally conscious British-born singer M.I.A., who in her new exclusive video for H&M, ‘Rewear it‘, highlights the environmental impact of clothes that end up in landfills all around the world. So, the singer decided to support the World Recycle Week campaign of the Swedish fashion giant, which from 18 to 24 April, during the week dedicated to recycling used clothes, will try to collect 1,000 tonnes of second-hand clothes in more than 3,600 shops.

The video, in the pop star’s rhythmic style, features dancers in Iceland, Senegal and United States and M.I.A. herself (wearing the same orange overall she wore in the video of the song Borders on refugees) moving on top of a pile of clothes. In an interview for Vogue, Maya said: “I even wear [things] in videos again! I have no shame about it, and I’m definitely not a pop star who has to wear something once and throw it away”.

 

M.I.A. video Rewear it
M.I.A. on a pile of clothes in her latest video Rewear it

 

M.I.A. admits that she hesitated before accepting her role in the campaign. These are reasonable doubts considering recent news on some H&M factories using child labour. But the possibility to invite people not to throw things that can be reused away, saving natural resources, was a stronger motivation. “If all [H&M] do is go and inspire another high-street brand to get in on caring and being conscious, or if H&M gets criticized for any of their factory processes, these are all good things”.

 

M.I.A. Rewear it H&M
M.I.A. in the set of the video Rewear it for the World Recycle Week from 18 to 24 April 2016 © H&M

 

Since H&M launched the Garment Collecting initiative in 2013, its clients recycled 25,000 tonnes of clothes they didn’t use any more. Once collected, the garments are sent in one of the seven establishments where they’re sorted and then sold in second-hand clothes, used as rags or padding or recycled.

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